Spring 2020 Schedule

Tuesday Workshop Schedule: Feb 25; Mar 03, 10, 17, 24, 31 

TD1: 7:00pm – 8:30pm: Dreamwork

Instructor: Tom Bonner, MBA, MA, NCC

Course Description: 

Through sharing of their own dreams, group members, guided by the group leader, will learn and develop basic techniques for working with their own dreams. Areas for discussion include how to capture and record dreams, the mental health benefits of considering dreams as a valuable resource for living in the present, some brief history of the importance of working with dreams, and possible techniques one might employ to better relate to the content and message of dreams.

Group meetings will be structured to include some element of non-experiential education, as well as the group experience of working with dreams. Members will be encouraged to record their dreams, and each group member would be offered the opportunity to bring a dream for the group. The group leader will establish a suitable framework to enhance learning while protecting group member’s well-being. 

 

ATTENTION: Continuing Education for Counselors and Social Workers 

PSP has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 6637. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. PSP is solely responsible for all aspects of the program. Participants are eligible to earn CE hours based on the number of groups attended and completion of a brief course evaluation. 

The State Board of Social Workers, Marriage and Family Therapists and Professional Counselors has pre-approved NBCC as a provider of continuing education courses and programs for Marriage and Family Therapists, Professional Counselors and Clinical Social Workers. 

PSP Full Semester Courses provide 15 clock hours CE credit or 1.25 clock hours credit per class attended, unless otherwise noted.**

 

Saturday Class Schedule: Jan 11, 18, 25; Feb 01, 08, 22, 29; Mar 07, 14, 21, 28; Apr 04 

FP 1: 9:00 – 10:15: Evolution of Psychoanalytic Technique, Part ll, The American Innovators

Instructors: Wally Fletcher, DMin, NCPsyA

Course Description 

This course will focus on the on-going evolution of modern psychoanalytic technique in America from World-War II to the present. It will build on the foundation laid in “Part I” in emphasizing innovative perspectives on:

  • The optimal treatment setting and conditions for effective psychoanalytic treatment
  • The trend toward relational, interpersonal and cultural perspectives in modern psychoanalytic theory and treatment
  • All aspects including the critical emotional dimensions of the therapist’s participation in the therapeutic relationship
  • Ways of dealing with transference, countertransference and resistance
  • The uses of interpretive, educative and interactional techniques in psychotherapy
  • Investigating the full range of human “problems in living” for which psychoanalysis can offer effective help

FP 2: 9:00 – 10:15: Far From The Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity 

Instructor: Elizabeth Lamb, LCSW

Course Description

Andrew Solomon, who is a gay child of straight parents, found a curious kinship with members of the deaf community.  While gayness and deafness tend to be considered deficits or illnesses by the (straight and hearing) parents of the gay and the deaf; each is a source of identity and community for gay and deaf individuals. This conundrum, which is shared by parents and children struggling with other physical and mental/emotional differences such as autism, Down syndrome and many others, poses an extraordinary challenge to parenting (an already near-overwhelming task) “different” children.  Is it the task of a good parent to “correct” the difference, or to help the child locate his identity within a community unknown to the parent?  

The task of the Modern Analyst, in working with both children and their parents, is similarly complex.  The maturational problems that people have are related to their very early childhood experiences, developmental experiences in adulthood and sources of trauma in their present lives.  This class, along with Solomon, explores how parents with offspring who differ from them—in ability, disability, sexual orientation or other radical ways—approach parenting them, how those various approaches are experienced by the children themselves, and what are the implications for the Modern Analyst.

SP 1: 10:25 – 11:40am: Essential Papers on Countertransference 

Instructor: Wally Fletcher, DMin, NCPsyA

Course Description

In the early days of psychoanalysis countertransference was treated largely as a necessary evil: necessary because analysts are human, and evil because the analyst’s human feelings and dynamics can easily distract them from focusing objectively on their client’s problems. The solution was for the analyst to reserve her/his emotional responses to clients and process them in their own analysis and supervision.

As psychoanalysis evolved, perspectives on the importance and uses of countertransference in clinical treatment have widened and deepened dramatically. The therapist is no longer assigned the impossible role of objective observer who should as Freud recommended (but did not practice): “…take as a model in psychoanalytic treatment the surgeon who puts aside all his own feelings, including that of human sympathy, and concentrates his mind on one single purpose, that of performing the operation as skillfully as possible” (1912).

Today increasingly the analyst is viewed as a participant observer in a very complex, interpersonal (ideally collaborative) process of exploration and healing of their client’s “problems in living” (H.S.Sullivan). In this context, study and use of the analyst’s countertransference is not only important for avoiding counter-therapeutic intrusions, but for understanding and advancing therapeutic progress. The analyst’s personal analysis, supervision and self-control remains as important as ever. But how the analyst makes clinical use of her/his countertransference to understand and help her patients becomes equally important.

This course will provide a survey of writings many psychoanalytic educators consider ‘essential” for serious students and practitioners of psychoanalysis. These papers represent a range of theoretical and clinical perspectives and our aim will be to consider their practical applications for our work with clients.

SP 2: 10:25 – 11:40am: Introduction to Modern Psychoanalytic Theory and Technique, Part II

Instructor: Dr. Bill Lorman, PhD

Course Description

Part Two continues where Part One left off and focuses on what the analyst does within the analytic framework.  We will continue to build on the therapeutic object relationship along with a review of the importance of the analytic triad of neutrality, abstinence and anonymity.  We will discuss contrary views within the modern psychoanalytic frame. We will also explore treatment options when treating the “difficult” patient. We will continue to build upon the concepts of transference and resistance, resistance to transference, narcissistic transference, countertransference.  In addition to readings and lectures, students will have an opportunity to present specific problematic dialogues from their own cases in order to fashion an appropriate therapeutic intervention.

Wednesday Class Schedule: Jan 22, 29; Feb 05, 12, 19, 26; Mar 04, 11, 18, 25; Apr 01, 08, 22, 29; May 06 

WD 1: 1:30 – 3:00pm: Psychoanalytic Theories of the Mind (conducted via teleconference only) 

Instructor: Dr. Jan Middeldorf, Colorado Center for Modern Psychoanalytic Studies

Course Description

We will study the works of three foundational psychoanalytic thinkers who developed radically new ways of looking at how human experience develops, and at the nature and cure of psychopathology.

Where Freud focused on drives, for Klein the relationship with, and internalization of objects is the root to the formation of mind. She recognized aggression as the source of most mental suffering, because it can never be felt towards the object without coming back on the self as external persecution. How the child is able to handle rage can lead to either psychotic, paranoid or depressive adaptations. Envy towards objects is another potently destructive force that Klein identifies as source of psychopathology when not balanced by gratitude.

Bion created a powerful theory of mind based on how experiences are processed, or not, on an emotional level. But he also believed that the encounter of analyst and patient was based on an emotional understanding that was beyond theory, and aimed solely at the truth of feelings that had not been adequately bound by verbal processing. His interest in the immediate experience of patients is clear from his recommendation that analysts approach each session without memory or desire, as a verbalizing reflection.

Kohut discovered that the self is constructed from the mirroring and idealizing responses a child receives from its caregivers (self objects), which create a healthy narcissism which is the basis for resilience and contentment. Indifference, criticism, belittlement and shaming wound the self’s narcissism and force the child to adopt compensatory strategies to assuage the hurting sense of self. Part of the analyst’s task is to be attentive to narcissistic wounds, external or happening in the analysis, and repairing them through acknowledgement and empathy.

Jan 15, 22, 29; Feb 05, 12, 19, 26; Mar 04, 11, 18, 25; Apr 01 

WD 2: 2:45 – 4:00pm: Culture and Diversity in Psychoanalysis 

Instructor: Aleisa Myles, PsyD 

Course Description

This course will help students strengthen their cultural sensitivity and explore issues of power, privilege, oppression, and prejudice as they pertain to clinical practice. We will examine multiple dimensions of identity, including race, class, gender, sexual orientation, age, and disability status. Students will have the opportunity to discuss how culture and diversity emerge in transference, countertransference, and the therapeutic process.

Jan 15, 22, 29; Feb 05, 12, 19, 26; Mar 04, 11, 18, 25; Apr 01 

WD3: 7:00 – 8:15pm: Case Presentation Workshop 

Instructor: Marie Hartke, MS.Ed., NCPsyA

Course Description

Psychoanalytic institutes offer a unique opportunity for students to incorporate didactic and experiential learning into practical application in the psychoanalytic treatment of patients. Concomitant with coursework, and as her psychoanalytic caseload grows, the student develops skills in gathering patient history, assessing and diagnosing, exploring resistances, identifying defense structures and developmental undercurrents, and understanding the patient-therapist dynamics.

The case presentation requirement at PSP is intended to provide a learning tool for both the “presenter” and the other participants. Rather than choosing a case that enables the student therapist to demonstrate her brilliant skills as an analyst, the student is advised to select a case that highlights some aspect of the treatment relationship that the therapist finds challenging. During the course of the semester, each student is expected to present sections of the write-up as well as engage in class discussion.

Tuesday Workshop Schedule: Feb 25; Mar 03, 10, 17, 24, 31 

TD1: 7:00pm – 8:30pm: Dreamwork

Instructor: Tom Bonner, MBA, MA, NCC

Course Description: 

Through sharing of their own dreams, group members, guided by the group leader, will learn and develop basic techniques for working with their own dreams. Areas for discussion include how to capture and record dreams, the mental health benefits of considering dreams as a valuable resource for living in the present, some brief history of the importance of working with dreams, and possible techniques one might employ to better relate to the content and message of dreams.

Group meetings will be structured to include some element of non-experiential education, as well as the group experience of working with dreams. Members will be encouraged to record their dreams, and each group member would be offered the opportunity to bring a dream for the group. The group leader will establish a suitable framework to enhance learning while protecting group member’s well-being. 

 

ATTENTION: Continuing Education for Counselors and Social Workers 

PSP has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 6637. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. PSP is solely responsible for all aspects of the program. Participants are eligible to earn CE hours based on the number of groups attended and completion of a brief course evaluation. 

The State Board of Social Workers, Marriage and Family Therapists and Professional Counselors has pre-approved NBCC as a provider of continuing education courses and programs for Marriage and Family Therapists, Professional Counselors and Clinical Social Workers. 

PSP Full Semester Courses provide 15 clock hours CE credit or 1.25 clock hours credit per class attended, unless otherwise noted.**